Reality Of Nigerian Economy

​Minister of Finance, Mrs. Kemi Adeosun, on Wednesday admitted that Nigeria was in its worst possible time with the Gross Domestic Product figures for the 2016 second quarter released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS).

The NBS report showed Nigeria’s economy is at its worst since in 29 years.

The nation’s external reserves fell by 2.86 per cent to $25.45bn on August 29, 2016, the latest report from the Central Bank of Nigeria showed on Wednesday. The foreign exchange reserves stood at $26.2bn at the end of July.

The continued scarcity of foreign exchange also pushed the naira to an all-time-low of 420 against the United States dollar at the parallel market.

The development came hours after the economy entered recession, according to the data released by the NBS.

Adeosun said the nation had a long way to go and the government was not deceiving itself that all was rosy.

She spoke with State House correspondents at the end of a meeting of the Federal Executive Council held inside the Presidential Villa, Abuja.

“It’s the worst possible time for us. Are we confused? Absolutely not,” the minister said.

She identified some of the ways the country could get out of recession to include diversification of the economy and investing in capital projects.

The minister said, “I think that we have a long way to go. We’re not confused and we’re not deceiving ourselves that everything is rosy. It’s not.

“It’s a difficult time for Nigeria but I think Nigeria is in the right hands and if we can stick with our strategy… We still have some adjustments to make. I think we need to make some adjustments in monetary policy.”

In the report released by the NBS, the GDP growth rate slid further from -0.36 per cent in the first quarter to -2.06 per cent.

It also released the capital importation report for the second quarter, the unemployment statistics, the inflation rate for July and the labour productivity report for July.

All the reports painted a negative picture of the Nigerian economy with inflation rising to 17.1 per cent from 16.5 per cent; the unemployment rate increasing to 13.3 per cent from 12.1 per cent and the investment inflows dropping to the lowest levels at $647.1m from $710m.

In terms of the GDP, the negative growth rate recorded in the second quarter of the year is a confirmation of the predictions by the Federal Government and economists that the country was heading for a recession.

A recession is defined as a significant decline in activities across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, employment, real income and wholesale retail trade.

The technical indicator of a recession is two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth as measured by a country’s GDP.

In nominal terms, the report put the country’s GDP at N23.48tn, adding that this was 2.73 per cent higher than the second quarter of 2015 value of N22.86tn.

The NBS, in the latest report, said, “In the second quarter of 2016, the nation’s Gross Domestic Product declined by -2.06 per cent (year-on- year) in real terms.

“This was lower by 1.70 percentage points from the growth rate of -0.36 per cent recorded in the preceding quarter, and lower by 4.41 percentage points from the growth rate of 2.35 per cent recorded in the corresponding quarter of 2015. Quarter-on-quarter, the real GDP increased by 0.82 per cent.”

The report stated that most of the sectors recorded huge declines in their GDP growth rates during the second quarter.

Some of them are oil, which recorded a negative GDP growth rate; manufacturing, -1.02 per cent; financial sector, 2.8 per cent; transport, 6.18 per cent; construction, 3.77 per cent; and real estate, 2.12 per cent.

For the manufacturing sector, the report said its drop in the GDP performance was as a result of high operating votes, which impacted negatively on capacity utilisation.

It said, “Nominal GDP growth in manufacturing in the second quarter of 2016 was recorded at negative 1.02 per cent (year- on-year), 1.09 percentage points lower than the 0.07 per cent recorded in the corresponding period of 2015.

“This was partly as a result of higher operating costs related to higher costs of inputs and alternative energy sources. Growth was 1.96 percentage points higher than the first quarter of 2016, when it was 2.98 per cent.”

For the oil sector, the report said the drop in crude oil production, which was caused by the activities of militants, adversely affected the growth of the industry.

It said, “During the period under review, oil production was estimated at 1.69 million barrels per day, 0.42 million barrels per day lower from the production in the first quarter of 2016.

“As a result, real growth in the oil sector was negative 17.48 per cent (year-on-year) in the second quarter of 2016.

“Growth declined by 10.68 percentage points and 15.59 percentage points relative to growth in the second quarter of 2015 and the first quarter of 2016, respectively.”

The report, however, said the financial and insurance sectors grew at 2.80 per cent in nominal terms (year-on-year) in the second quarter.

It added that while the growth rate of financial institutions was insignificant, the insurance industry recorded a growth rate of 19.55 per cent.

For the real estate sector, the report stated that its 2.12 per cent growth was lower by 8.57 percentage points than the growth rate reported for the same period in 2015 and higher by 1.51 percentage points compared to the preceding quarter.

Under the capital importation report, the NBS said that the economy recorded its lowest investment level with a total investment inflow of $647.1m in the second quarter of 2016.

The amount, according to the bureau in the report released by the Statistician General of the Federation, Dr. Yemi Kale, represents a fall of 8.98 per cent, relative to the first quarter.

It added that the decrease was also a decline of 75.73 per cent, relative to the second quarter of 2015.

The report said the continued decline in the value of investment inflows into the economy was symptomatic of the difficult period that the Nigerian economy was going through.

It added, “The second quarter saw the economy enter into the first recession during the rebased period, according to the technical definition of two consecutive periods of decline. This may suggest less profitable opportunities for investment.

“In addition, in the second quarter, there was considerable uncertainty surrounding the future exchange rate policy, which may have deterred investors. The naira was allowed to depreciate towards the end of the quarter. These factors were likely to have contributed to the record decline in capital importation.”

The report said year-on-year, the investment inflows declined for each broad type (foreign direct investment, portfolio investment and other investment).”

Portfolio investment, it noted, recorded the largest decline of 88.76 per cent year-on-year, compared with the declines of 37 per cent and 1.22 per cent for foreign direct and other investments, respectively.

The NBS also said the unemployment rate had risen from 12.1 per cent in the first quarter of this year to 13.3 per cent as of the end of the second quarter.

It said the number of people unemployed or underemployed increased from 24.4 million as of the end of the first quarter to 26.06 million persons.

A further analysis of the report revealed that between the third quarter of last year and the second quarter of this year, the number of those unemployed had risen by 4.5 million.

The report said, “The number of underemployed in the labour force (those working but doing menial jobs not commensurate with their qualifications or those not engaged in fulltime work and merely working for few hours) increased by 392,390 or 2.61 per cent, resulting in an increase in the underemployment rate to 19.3 per cent in Q2 2016 from 19.1 per cent in Q1 2016.

“During the reference period, the number of unemployed in the labour force increased by 1,158,700 persons, resulting in an increase in the national unemployment rate to 13.3 per cent in Q2 2016 from 12.1 in Q1 2016.”

The report also said, “In July, the Consumer Price Index, which measures inflation, increased by 17.1 per cent (year-on-year), 0.6 percentage points higher from the rate recorded in June (16.5 per cent).

“The pace of the increase in the headline index was however weighed upon by a slower increase in three divisions; health, transport and recreation and culture divisions.

“Energy and energy-related prices continue to be the largest increases reflected in the Core sub-index. In July, the Core sub-index increased by 16.9 per cent during the month, up by 0.7 per cent points from rates recorded in June (16.2 per cent).”
Federal Government says it is focused on how to turn around the nation’s economy despite the staggering economic situation, which has pushed inflation to a double digit of 17.1.

The declaration followed on the heels of the submission by the National Bureau of Statistics that the economy was technically in a recession.

But at the end of the Federal Executive Council Meeting presided over by President Muhammadu Buhari, the Minister of Finance, Mrs. Kemi Adeosun, admitted that though it was the worst possible economic season for Nigeria, the government was not confused about what to do in order to salvage the situation in the interest of Nigerians.

Adeosun said, “It’s the worst possible time for us. Are we confused? Absolutely not. How are we going to get ourselves out of this recession? One, we must make sure that we diversify our economy.

“There are many people who want us to keep on relying on oil. We can see what happened at the output data of the oil and gas sector. What’s happening in the Niger Delta has dragged down the GDP of the entire economy.

“We’re too dependent on oil whereas 87 percent of our GDP should be non-oil. So let us drive those other areas.

“We have to invest in capital projects. No, we are not confused; the times are confusing but we are not confused.

“We are extremely focused. We know that if we can just bear and get through this difficult period, Nigeria is going to be better for it.

“If we rely on oil and the price of oil remains low and the quantity of oil remains low, we can’t grow. We have to grow our non-oil economy.

“I think we that we have a long way to go. We’re not confused and we’re not deceiving ourselves that everything is rosy. It’s not. It’s a difficult time for Nigeria but I think Nigeria is in the right hands and if we can stick with our strategy.

“We still have some adjustments to make. I think we need to make some adjustments in monetary policy. It’s quite clear we do and we will do that. We’re working on that. We need to try and find a way to support the manufacturing sector better and we will do that.”

Joined by her counterparts from Information and Culture, Agriculture, Mines and Steel Development and Education, Lai Mohammed, Audu Ogbeh, Kayode Fayemi and Adamu Adamu, respectively, Adeosun also revealed that FEC approved external three-year rolling borrowing plan.

She said the borrowing plan which will be transmitted to the National Assembly for its approval will be concessional loans average with interest rates 1.25 percent, four to seven year moratorium, 20 years to pay.

The Minister disclosed that the borrowings would come from agencies such as the World Bank, African Development Bank, China EXIM Bank, and other development agencies like Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Eurobonds.

Adeosun said that the loans would be applied to strategic sectors that will help to revive the economy.

She cited the case of the Ministry of Solid Minerals, which had already procured a World Bank loan of $150million to enable it to strengthen its capacity and generate revenue from the sector.

Wednesday’s FEC also approved a new roadmap for solid minerals which seeks to grow the mining sector for a better GDP for the country.

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